So My Son Has A ‘Stache

On Wednesday of remote learning week two, I notice my son has hair growing on his upper lip. When did that happen? I vaguely remember him saying he was shaving, but I clearly didn't believe him. My post isn't really about mustaches and eighth graders. Like many parents world-wide, this shift has been stressful for me. I wear many hats in my district, and this time of school closure has increased my workload. I feel the anxiety and stress creeping in the minute I wake up and ponder my "to do" list. Sound familiar?

Low Tech High Impact Learning: Spoons As Formative Assessment

So while I am always on the lookout for ways to bring the latest technology into my classroom, my goal is not to just bring tech to my students. My pedagogy guides my use of tech, and recently, my use of spoons. Helping students practice mastery in an engaging way is always my goal. One morning in my first hour Spanish class, I contemplated student interests and how I might leverage that for our Friday Fun day.

Bloom Where You Are Planted

Whether you are in the #OneWord movement, make your own New Year's resolution, or not doing either of those, there is usually some moment of reflection and, maybe, dreaming as the new year approaches. I like the choosing one word that can guide me through the year, so I give it quite a bit of thought, attention, and I never refuse a bit of luck along the way. As I pondered this one, I was a bit stumped. I was uninspired. I was stymied, and then Christmas was right around the corner. What to do. What to do.

Make Writing Magical Again

Getting students to practice our content area and have fun while doing it is the challenge we face as educators today. If students do not have the desire to write, solve problems, and create, how can we develop an excitement and love for learning while meeting all the demands of our curriculum? We can. Here's one way of many to bring the magic back to writing in your classroom. If you teach subjects not related to writing, then feel free to modify this as suits the demands of your curriculum and subject matter.

Embrace the New: Dealing with Disaster

Let's face it. At some point in your educational career, something will inevitably NOT go as planned. It happens in classrooms, buildings, and districts. We plan and plan, but then the execution does not have the result that we intend. It fails. Flops. Crashes. Burns. So then what do we do? Get embarrassed, dejected, angry, stressed or all of the above? Sure. What should we do instead?

The Main Thing

My family and I recently attended a For King And Country concert with some long time family friends of ours. Tom, my husband's college roommate, works with a nonprofit organization which was one of the three businesses promoting the concert, so we attended as his guests. While waiting for the doors to open, Tom gets a call that changed our evening and inspired this post.

The Learning Jukebox

I recently took my mom to her hand surgery in the wee hours of the morning. She had to check in at 6:30 a.m., and we were an hour and a half away. As I drove her car before the sun or chickens were up, her CD (Yes, CD. Mom doesn't have an aux cord or Spotify) player plus copious amounts of caffeine helped me stay awake. As we listened to the songs of her childhood, I began thinking about our eclectic taste in music and how it evolves as we grow older. And as I pondered this and avoided the deer emerging from the trees to cross the road, I thought about how we are often unwilling to be eclectic and let our mindset, tools, and strategies evolve in education.

Canoe Trips & Leadership

There are several similarities between a canoe trip down the river and how school districts or buildings (or even businesses) can function. Regardless of the obstacles in the way, we need to work together to go around them, through them, or drag our canoes past them until it is safe to float again.

Push Me, Please

I Could Make It Alone, I Got All That I Need to Survive I had an epiphany while reading Relentless by Hamish Brewer recently. As I put the finishing touches on my #BookSnaps of the quote below then saved and exited Snapchat, I realized it really grabbed me. Definitely. By the throat. You might be … Continue reading Push Me, Please

The Disappearing Ink Doodle Pen of Education

My church did a VBS (Vacation Bible School) this year after taking a few summers off from hosting one. Our fearless leader, Robyn, an elementary principal, choose the kit, ROAR, from Group Publishing, and we began a quick 2 week preparation. Robyn and I are experienced at leading VBS, but we are also busy educators, … Continue reading The Disappearing Ink Doodle Pen of Education